by Nicole Urbschat

by Nicole Urbschat

ON A QUEST FOR INNOVATION

Widely regarded as one of Germany’s most important designers, Schönberger first leapt to fame in the '90s with a series of signature men’s collections noted for their sharp and edgy tailoring. After designing for Joop! and spending more than eight years as Creative Director for German sportswear giant adidas, Schönberger has recently been named new Global Creative Officer of MCM. The '80s cult brand became popular for its flashy logo leather goods. After being acquired by the South Korean businesswoman Sung-Joo Kim in 2005, MCM is now a leader when it comes to speaking to the new luxury consumers. With Schönberger's innate knowledge of pop, youth and street culture, owner Sung-Joo Kim is bullish about growing the brand to exceed one billion dollars in turnover by 2020. And it’s clear how they plan to do this: by not only selling products but also letting consumers immerse themselves in the world of MCM.

We have met Dirk for an interview about his new role as Global Creative Officer at MCM.

by Björn Lüdtke

by Björn Lüdtke

THE ERA OF DIGITALIZATION

Digitalization affects every aspect of modern lifestyle. #FASHIONTECH BERLIN is looking into the latest trends that shape our lives, such as street culture, e-sports and gaming, or mindful living.

The fashion and lifestyle industries are as concerned with digital transformation as other industries are. Initiated by the fast turnover of information through social media, trends quickly travel around the world.

Consumers and their habits adapt at the same rapid speedey expect all-access everywhere, easy navigation, and fast results, no matter the channel. Within these industries, the desire for novelty is inherent and digitalization itself has become the accelerator of this yearning.

The transformation involves every step of the industries’ supply chain: from buying and production, to marketing, communications, sales and distribution, and finally the presentation in showrooms or retail stores.

by Quynh Tran

by Quynh Tran

FASHION’S STRUGGLE WITH COLOUR

In terms of real colour, it seems like the fashion wheel hasn’t turned since China Machado graced Harper’s Bazaar as the first non-white model of colour in the editorial of a major fashion magazine.

She was only the first in a row of new, strong women who challenged a previously white beauty standard: in the couple of decades that followed, icons like Doyale Luna, Tina Chow, Pat Cleveland, Iman, Beverly Johnson, Mounia and Grace Jones literally dashed some colour on high fashion, both with their looks and personalities, and inspired the likes of Cristobal Balenciaga and Yves Saint Laurent.

But while the world has become more interdependent and societies mingle through migration and technology, the industry most notorious for its fast pace seems to be moving backwards in time in 2019 when it comes to the people: as if to scorn their heritage, Balenciaga and Saint Laurent are among the most prominent brands in the ever-same discussion about runways that are dominated by white models; reports of discrimination against people of colour at high fashion companies and in stores surface on a regular basis; and outcries about cultural appropriation and racist images are spinning around in circles.